Does anesthesia have long term effects on a child’s brain?

September 28, 2008

Whether anesthesia, or surgery, or some combination of the two, have long-lasting effects on the brain of children is an important question which researchers are trying very hard to answer. Three new studies provide some cause for concern.

In a non-clinical, (epidemiologic), study from Columbia University the authors used databases to review cases in which children had hernia surgery in the first four years of life. They found that these children, compared with a control group, had almost twice as much risk of subsequently developing behavioral or developmental disorders.

In a second study, from the Mayo Clinic, the risk of learning disabilities in children after a single anesthetic was not different from a control group but the risk did increase after two or three anesthetics and in the cases where the duration of the anesthetic was longer than 2 hours.

Finally, a Dutch study of children who had urologic surgery. “Neurocognitive” development was evaluated by means of a questionnaire completed by parents. Children who had their procedures before the age of two years had lower scores but the study wasn’t large enough to say with any certainty that this age cut-off is important. Read the rest of this entry »